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20121101
20121130
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LINKTV 81
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
, farad did that. i guess he read that and he told us that in mecca, the streets were paved with gold. he said, "there are mansions there, built for you already, and they're waiting for you." and when i went there, i saw rocks and sand. you know, that was before aramco pulled out, you know, and turned over everything to the saudis, the kingdom of saudi arabia. so i saw rocks and sand- i didn't see any streets paved with gold; there was no golden fountains in the hotels or anything. now there are, but- >> yeah, i'll say. fire away, janet. >> is that part of what helped change your mind and increase your understanding was the fact that you saw rocks and sand instead of the- >> no. my father was disappointed. i expected- by that time, i was old enough and really informed of what the world looked like enough to not to be disappointed. my father was disappointed. before he went to saudi arabia- and he made umrah, the lesser pilgrimage. he made umrah, where you go by yourself, not with all the muslims- the annual pilgrimage. and he made the lesser pilgrimage to mecca, he went to pakistan, he we
rad. movement, or migration both within mexico and north tohe u.s. we explore a major and unexpected source of migras caedw re bskf e usionofaquies can change the rate of flow, or if a new u.s. border policy is having an unintended consequence. ( helicopter whirring ) narrator: every day, thousands of mexicans cross the border illegally into the united states. ofte those hopes are arrested manyre at the border. man: ahora lista pont la mano en frente... narrator: the u.s. i.n.s., or immigration and naturalization service, records each apprehension on standard forms, including one entry with hidden lue: it washe migrants' home towns inexico. that's whabringseograpr chard jones to the i.n. it washe migrants' home towns with a novel reseah plan. jones knows that ecomic conditions vary greatly om region to region in mexico. he suspects that some places drive ou- or "push"-- many more migrants to the u.s. than others. hehis investigation beginses drily90s- or "push"-- aris home inanoniotes. hehis ijones lieves beginses many secrets are stored in i.n.s. files like tse. can theyeveal where
caedollow re weskf e usionof s can change the rate of flow, or if a new u.s. border policy is having an unintendeconsequence. ( helicopter whirring ) narrator: every day, thousands of mexicans cross the border illegally into the united states. often, those hopes are arrested manyre at the border.o man: ahora lista po la mano frente... narrator the u.s. i.n.s., or immigration and naturalization service, records each apprehension on standard forms, including one entrywith hid: it was the migrants' home towns inexico. that's whabringseograpr richard jones to the i.n. with a novel reseah plan. jones knows that economic conditions vary greatly om region to region in mexico. he suspects that some places drive ou- or "push"-- many more migrants to the u.s. than others. hehis investigation beginses driin tly90s "push"-- aris hom in sanoniotes. jones lieves many secrets are stored in i.n.s. files like tse. can they reveal where most migrants come om? can the answers help both countries keep more ople at home? cjones sampless every tenth record, writing down the area of origin within mexico.
. and many of us, like myself, that spent a long time, a career out in the street picking up garbage and sweeping streets, we started thinking, "why do we need an artist?" "what we really need is a good mechanic, or somebody that can build trucks." it was the last person we thought we needed. but as i got to know her and the department got to know her, we appreciated bringing an artist into the department. she's done an awful lot for us. it's like a ballet sort of, you know? he dumps, and then these two guys crisscross each other. this guy will start pushing it down, and you'll see the other machine works from the bottom. ukeles: my work has a lot to do with walking. just plain walking through a place has a lot of meaning for me. i look back on my work, and you can see me sort of walking through systems or cities, towns. i've already had the opportunity to create a public artwork on a landfill at danehy park in cambridge, massachusetts. the landfill was closed in 1972, healed, and then reopened 20 years later as a park. this used to be a terrible, smelly dump. now, it's reborn. i cre
, of the dead may be cook healthy [inaudible]. >> well we're very happy to have dr. glenn shive with us thank you very much for coming down here. >> pleasure. >> i'll definitely need some help as you can tell. let me - you're going to china in a couple of days. >> indeed. >> but just a little back ground your interest in china and chinese religions. >> well i studied religion in temple university in philadelphia. and then went in to chinese history and my degree is in chinese history, modern, but also always interested in chinese thought and the classics. i went to taiwan in the years before it was possible for americans to go to the main land to study, i studied classical chinese and so the great writers, philosophers and thinkers at the time and then i ended up writing my dissertation about mao tse-tung, so very i'm much in the contemporary era. so i've kind of done a lot of things in taiwan to shanghai where i taught at east china normal university and later in hong kong, where i'm going again as a full writer. >> okay that's good. how long did it take you to get through grad school? >> th
this culture, the meaning is mutually accepted. the use of symbols is the single most distinguishing feature of any culture. but as distinct as they are, all symbols are used for the same purpose -- to communica, manipulate, and preserve information. the circle of coral symbolizes the night sky. but this lesson depends on the use of language, a symbolic system in which arbitrary sounds are joined together and given meaning. of all symbolic systems, language best communicates very complex ideas. here, celestial navigation is taught on a south pacific island. we begin to learn language and other symbolic systems at birth. in time, they become a part of who we are and how we perceive the world. still, it's difficult for those of us in one culture to fully understand the symbolic systems of another. for archaeologists, the task is even more complex. the cultures they study can no longer be directly observed. archaeologist david webster. webster: suppose i came into this stadium a week, or even a century, after all the people left. how would i figure out what happened here ? what this arena was u
to an extremely urbanid and mobile population. in the u.s., many urban areas are characterized by diverse cultures, which create a rich ethnic mosaic. oufocus is boston, massachuse, part of a megalopolis located on the northeastern seaboa othe iteds. macaciopulio part of a megalopolis locahave taken root in older seainner-city neighborhoods. in recent decades, these neighborhoods deteriorated, with a downward spiral in infrastructure, services and opportunities. bunow stons bouncing back. with a downward spiral we'll see how relative location to the central business district, or cbd, is important to the development of these neighborhoods-- how so much can ride on their being part of federally-funded enterprise zones and how geographic information systems, or gis, can be used in addressing some difficult urban economic and social issues. boston, massachusetts. once a great port, it's now a world leader in high tech, higher education, bmedicine and finance. but like most u.s. cities, boston lost many jobs and middle-class residents to the suburbs. it's a regional problem-- part of the widening gap b
they use. households in such simple economies are almost completely self-sufficient. at the other end of the spectrum are highly complex economies in which people specialize in one particular job, like these shoe salesmen in morocco. specialization means people are no longer self-sufficient, but depend on each other. the shoe salesmen are dependent on the shoemakers, and the shoemakers are dependent on the tanners, and so on. this dependence on others makes society in general more complex, so specialization is a measure of society's overall complexity. archaeologists find evidence of specialization everywhere -- in the buildings and sculpture of ancient cities, and in crafts like elegant jade earrings, decorated pottery and even skulls with jade inlays in their teeth. these craft items were all made by specialists who worked at the ancient maya city of copan. between a.d. 400 and 800, this magnificent city flourished as one of the major centers of maya art and culture. copan was built in a broad mountain valley on the western border of honduras. at its height, the economic system of t
and difficult process. we will see how one geographer is using global positioning system-- or gps technology-- as one tool to study how the land resources in south africa are being distributed and utilized. ( choral group singing in native language ) in ail 199 south ricans particited ( cin their nation'sng first democratic elections) and chose nelson mandela as their president. one of the greatest challenges facing the new post-apartheid regime was toive the jority black population access to the landrom which they had been forcibly removed. they just came in and tell us that we have to move out. we said, "we can't move out, because this land is... is ours. this land was bought by our grandfathers in 1905." but they just moved us, just on account of jlous. apartheid... apartheid wasted our time. narrator: under apartheid, south africa's black majority-- almost 90% of the population-- was moved onto less than 15% of the land. these so-called homelands were often marginal areas with little inand minimal. the white minority controlled were85% of the land,areas including the richest, most produc
can't just go and move a brush around. i have to have a beginning. i don't want to just use models, figures. i just want to have some reason. and the beginning is adam and eve and a tree and a serpent and a garden, and that's enough, see. except that pat didn't like that kind of biblical con-- you know. and she said, "don't use adam and eve and creation. just say, 'you and me.'" and i liked that very much. i almost got that, didn't i, pat? passlof: yes. i can see just what i can do, and i could almost see the right thing to do. it wouldn't take much to get this started, huh? but, you know, i did this all in a couple of hours. the first five minutes is the best. [ laughing ] after that, you're in trouble. what am i going to do with these paintings? i have to think of something that will give me a start. i don't like the size of the figures. it's the wrong size. passlof: well, it's easy to cut them down. mm-mmm. i thought i could manage this size, and i now i see -- they are much larger than you usually do. yeah. and this, of course, is ridiculous. and that's ridiculous. absolutely r
. >> in this country, we take care of our own, especially our veterans who have served us so bravely and have sacrificed so selflessly in our name. we carry on knowing that our best days always lie ahead. >> a major new investigation reveals how thousands of veterans are being denied disability benefits due to errors by the department of veterans affairs. >> there is nearly out of resources and in about of accumulated trauma that these soldiers, marines, and air men are experiencing, because of the war itself, continues to accumulate the law the war goes on. the military is playing catch- up more than 16,000 veterans are homeless. an estimated 18 veterans commit suicide every year. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. "the new york times"is reporting high-level officials were notified in the late summer about the decision of david petraeus to resign. the relationship between him and his biographer paula broadwell was uncovered in an investigation. members of congress have complained they were not informed of the findings until just after the ele
these graphics. what i thought i would do is simply pull some basic terminology out for us, give us some basic language. and i thought i would do it since we are so well educated now, it's about time to kick us all out into the real world and use our six dimensions of religion. i thought i would take our six dimensions of religion, put it in that framework and just, we are not pretending as always that we are learning everything about east asian religion, but what we are trying to do is draw out some key answers to profound life questions here. anyway, looking at the graphics. first off, difficulty number one, if we haven't already listened to some other difficulties for westerners looking at this, we are so used to labeling. but when we think about the picture of chinese religion, it's a combination of confucianism, taoism, and buddhism in the mix, perhaps some christianity, some folk religion. we'd move to japan and we'll see the same set but also with shinto elements in there so it's a full world view, a full lifestyle, we have to keep that in mind even though we are dividing things up. so
. oh, jamal, who knows what life has in store for us ? so, mr. brashov, have you hired katherine's replacement ? no. i have decided that this should be katherine's final task at the cafe. oh ! you're joking. - of course he's joking. - not at all. who better than you to find someone who is qualified to step into your shoes ? if you say so. i think it's an excellent idea. wait a minute. what if i don't like katherine's choice ? don't worry, rosa. i'll find someone who will make you feel as if i've never left. that's what i'm afraid of. not bad. not bad at all. hey, that's great ! yeah ? yeah, tell him i'll call him back. we got a shot. what do you know ? i think he really likes it. so, does this mean you'll sign us to a contract ? this just means i'm thinking about it. look at this. i hear bands from morning to night, and a lot of them sound promising, just like you. am i missing something ? look, almost anybody can sound good in a recording. you push the right buttons, turn the right dials, even i can carry a tune. that's technology. now, the real question is, what is a band go
the questions for tonight's debate. the results of the candidate survey are used by the san francisco public press to create a non-partisan voter guide that summarizes where the candidates stand on the issue and will be available on the website soon. meanwhile hvnnjp. preview you may pick up a copy of the current issue of the san francisco public press at the table in the back of the room, which has a fold out summarizing the candidates' position. a little bit about the format of this evening's event. each question will be directed to three candidates or in some cases two. each of these candidates will have one minute to respond. following the named candidates' responses, other candidates may elect to use one of their three discretionary time cards, which they have all been provided. to speak to the question for one minute as well. we ask that after the candidate uses the card, they deposit the card in the basket in front of them, so each candidate, in fact, uses the card on only three occasions. the timekeeper in the first row will hold up a yellow card to signify to the speaking candidat
today. when most of us think of children with exceptional or special needs, the first thing that comes to mind is someone with obvious physical, emotional, or developmental handicaps or disabilities. catch the handles. good girl. whoop! whoa. there you go. go for it. hendrick: and in many cases, the needs of the children in our care will be apparent and obvious to us. turn. go to the door. but sometimes, difficulties take a while to show up. because we caregivers see children for such extended periods of time and we've known so many children, may be the first to recognize signs that a child may need more help and more support. notice how this teacher is observing and taking notes. it's very important for us to recognize learning challenge early, because early identification and proper intervention means that physical, emotional, or developmental conditions may be cleared up entirely, or at least the effect of the condition can be minimized. [humming] but nothing can be done, no individualized plan or program can even begin to be put into place, till the child is correctly identified as
with los angeles in the u.s. and mexico city, are defined by geographers for their enormous size. tountryazil, the mega-city ofaoau has joined the ranks of these world-famousetpolises, a population of 1milliopeople at the startof t 21st century. sao paulo is a city of immigras, at the startof t 21st century. who built it neighborhood by neighborhood. the first immigrants to arrive were portuguese explorers and jesuit missionaries, wlanguage a religio 1554 ans bureal growth did not begin until the 19th ctury. between 1880 and the 1950s, more tn ve million italians came to sao paulo, atacted by jobs in a booming coffee industry. along with these agricultural workers came small business owners and craftsmen who established an italian enclave cled bixiga on the outskirts othe city. , geographer fisco scarlatost nestudies immigration patterns, assimilation anthe expansion of sao paulo. r him,iss t oncamic. he was an artisan anhe. myaterl grandfher came at the beginning ofhe century. narrator e factory is sti inthan ever.y day,bigger l bias sao pau grew around it,ed and rthe neighbor
us a little bit about how you affect the community. i mean there is stuff going on all around here i can tell. >> well it started 16 years ago when i first came. in this same room i had a meeting with the counsel about 15 whites, average age, of about 70. and as i as having the meeting to accept this call, i looked around and every window here was boarded up. what those people had done they had locked themselves in. swedes, they had locked themselves in, nothing could get in, and nothing could get out. so i knew that night, when i accept this call that something had to be done. and the very next day, we started working, because we do know what the community needs; we do know what the black church speaks for and we were able to go and they helped me and found out one thing that it was not as bad as they thought. they noticed that from time to time, i'd rub my hands and see nothing could come off, it didn't come off we are good. so what we are able to do now, we try to hold on to a little of their history, so they wouldn't be just wiped out and we brought our history in and we mixed th
affects us all, and we've been linking the doctrinal and the ethical and the social dimension together as we've been moving through this, and we're going to do some more formal notes on the ethical dimension. but how people behave certainly does affect us all. and you know, we're supposed to not date the teleclass, but i don't know, when really tragic events occur, i don't think it necessarily dates them to bring it up. and of course, as we are involved in this class, you know, we've just had a hugely tragic worldwide event in which american embassies were attacked and many, many people died. now we have to hold off here because this just occurred and we don't know if there is religious implications behind this, though, you know, most people suspect that we're once again looking at the tension between the secular west that we'll look at certainly in our next class, and the quest for the islamic world to hold off against that and to take just about any measure in that. so it's an extraordinary power- we have to be very careful here because we don't know yet who is responsible for this a
of water dowsing-- finding underground water using forked sticks-- has been going on for centuries. typically, the dowser grasps the fork of the stick and points the other end skyward. then, as he's walking along and happens to pass over a supply of underground water, the end of the stick, or divining rod, supposedly twists downward, showing where to dig the well. in reality, almost anywhere you popoint the stick, you'd eventually find water. although its depth varies considerably from place to place, water is present beneath the earth's surface almost everywhere, even under the driest deserts. most people tend to take groundwater for granted, but it's a tremendously valuable resource upon which most of us depend. over 1/2 of the u.s. population relies on it for its drinking-water supply. even more groundwater's used for irrigating agriculture, and its industrial use is growing every day. groundwater is valuable because it's plentiful and clean. there's about 50 times more water underground than in all the lakes and rivers on the earth's surface combined. in many areas, especially
programs call 1-800-learner and visit us at www.learner.org. ¿la podría usar, en una oración, por favor?c'. en el evento improbable de que su firma de corretaje cierre, sipc está ahí para protegerlo. sipc. c-i- lo siento, roberto. eso es incorrecto. lisa flores. lisa, tu palabra también es 'sipc'. ¿podría tenerla en otra oración, por favor? los fondos de sipc están disponibles para satisfacer las reclamaciones de los clientes de firmas de corretaje hasta un máximo de $500,000, incluyendo hasta $100,000 por rec 'sipc', eftivo s-i-p-k. ¿no conoce a sipc - securities investor protection corporation? no importa. se lo deletrearemos. visite nos www.sipc.org. usted tiene el derecho de permanecer callado. usted tiene el derecho de ser escuchado. cualquier cosa que usted diga... lo que usted diga será escuchado con dignidad y respeto. usted tiene derecho a información y asistencia. sin justicia para las víctimas de crimen, no hay justicia. >> the 16th-century metaphysical poet john donne said, "no man is an island, entire of itself." in fact, as social beings, we are connected. but
show them all inus.ifferent cereals, it doesn't seem to give us better health re, it doesn't seem to give us lower costs, but it does give us choice, and we value choice above everything. from a practical point of view, the first decision many consumers are confronted with is how to finance their health care. the choices are simply to pay for it themselves, or to enroll in a private or public health insurance plan. a lot is said about the marketplace of health care. well, for half of people who are getting their health plan through an employer, their employer offers such a narrow range of plans that they-- the consumer-- feel that they are cut off from options they really would like to have. many employers only offer plans that require a patient co-pay or less expensive hmos. cost-sharing makes the assumption that the person can identify what's an appropriate and inappropriate service. and so you go to the doctor, and you're looking for help, and you have to pay maybe 20% of the doctor bill. so, because of that 20% of the doctor bill, you're supposed to be able to say, "doc, do i
life-saving treatment for the first time. the u.s. government has joined with some of its biggest foreign rivals in opposing an international moratorium on capital punishment. the u.n. general assembly voted against the death penalty earlier this week by a vote of 110 to 39, with u.s. joined in opposition by countries including iran, north korea, syria, and china. british prosecutors have charged two former top executives at rupert mourdock's news international with bribing public officials for information. rebekah brooks, a former editor and onetime head of news international, is accused of conspiring to pay $160,000 in bribes to a british defense ministry official over a seven- year period. brooks has been a close confidante of mourdock's as well as a friend of british prime minister david cameron. in a separate incident, andy coulson, a former editor who once served as scammers spokesperson, is also facing bribery charges. he and brooks already face criminal charges stemming from the scandal that led to the shutdown of murdoch's news of the world tabloid last year amidst revela
, "tell me who this person is." i actually do find that a useful way of defining the notion of hollywood. now, joan, for you, has this hollywood style shaped your work? have you been moving away from it consciously or not? i don't see that one could make films or even live your life without being affected by hollywood style. it's so much a part of what we all grew up on what we all see what we all talk about, think about and it's almost a common language amongst, certainly people in america. i guess what i'm curious about is i want to ask james why do you think that executives are uncomfortable with more personal things and they prefer things that seem to be referential to other films-- because they'll do better? because they simply fit into something they've already done, so they feel...? despite presenting themselves as risk takers most executives in hollywood are quite the contrary. they are people allergic to risk. whit, you haven't had that much experience in hollywood itself but to what extent have you used it as a model to define yourself if necessarily against or next to...? i re
's presented. but coming from a devout muslim, could you explain the five pillars of islam to us? >> yeah. these five pillars basically are- there are two aspects of- that we just call the five articles of faith, and then the practice of that faith comprised into the five pillars of islam. and the first pillar of islam, it is called shahada- it means bearing witness to the truth- and it goes like that, that i be a witness there is no god but allah, and i bear witness that mohammed is his final the last messenger. now this is a kind of confession out of credal formula, in a sense that anybody who wants to be- join the community of the muslims just has to take the shahada or make- confess that in the public, he will be considered as a muslim. now how one muslim, or a person being a muslim must live as his relation to god, then these are the rest of the other four pillars which explain. and so from that, the second would be what muslims call the salaat, or the performance of the worship prayer. and this worship prayer- five times daily, prayers are called- now they are performed in congregat
. i think all of us have been traumatized by something and then we have this need, this obsession to tell stories and to rework the world within our own guidelines. (upbeat music playing) certain independent filmmakers are independent because they can't make movies they want to make within the studio system. (upbeat music playing) aaahh! if the movies work, and they make a profit, then the studios are going to be saying, "hey, why don't you make a movie for us?" "we want that money that you made for those guys." (narrator) in mainstream hollywood, a picture averages $42 million in production and marketing. an independent film can cost a fraction of that amount. in order to survive, major studios have to produce films that appeal to a mass audience. but independent filmmakers with lower budgets can take risks that hollywood won't, producing films that are original. how independent films are made varies, but filmmakers on the edge of hollywood all have one overriding desire: make films on their own terms. it is very, very difficult for something new to come from within hollywood. it
the earth quake are finally being done in our church. and they have offered that to us free of charge with a very welcoming approach. and this is a version of black-korean relationship that doesn't make the headlines and i think that kind of thing is going on, but it's on the community level and the media don't find that as interesting as some of the conflicts that have occurred. >> you know the media question aside, one reason why i wanted to bring that in at this juncture of the course at the end, is that it brings out another key class theme that keeps hitting me over and over again and it's been fairly recent. that there really is no such thing as religion, there are human beings and all these different religious organizations and religious systems that we've talked about this semester and we barely scratched the surfaces as you well know. there are people who for whatever reason and however they do are letting their religion transform them. and i think we've hit on it too many times to say it's just fluff for words or optimism or polly anna attitude when people allow their religi
was magnificent and saved us mucho dollars- or shekels, i should say- over there, and may have saved our lives in a couple of instances by knowing where to go. when we were moved through- he knew through networking within his own community where the hot spots are. for instance, one week it was possible to go to bethlehem, which is in palestinian areas, but certain things were happening and he would know a couple days later, "not safe; don't go there." just some really- we got so over into the west bank that we could actually see jordan, and yet we were able to move through communities in the palestinian territories with all the machine guns and those things you've seen- you know, the towers and the places where the palestinians are stopping- we managed to move through those kinds of tense situations with minimum hassle. so i'm very glad to be back and alive. but the key thing is what we were able to accomplish. with our incredible contacts, we went directly to nazareth. and actually, networking is an amazing thing, because the local episcopal priest in mccomb, of all places, mccomb, illinois,
with us the holy land, it's okay. but not to control, not to reign, not to occupy, not to, you know, humiliate people, like what's going on in the west bank. >> and it's hard to believe that when somebody will take his land to give up and to say, "okay, let's have peace, and our land is with them," it's so difficult to believe, and if we look here, and the mountains that is our land here, and israel. they take and give to the jews, from our land. it's difficult to have peace in that situation. how could i trust them when they just all the time try constantly to humiliate and to expand, and just in that point of view, how can we trust them and have peace? >> but this is a central problem of our life here, there's no doubt, and i'll answer for myself and not as a spokesperson for the institute right now. in my opinion, the only basis for a solution in relations between palestinians and jews in the land of israel is a partition into two states, and let me explain. originally, in 1947, the united nations called upon a division, or called for a division of the land of israel into two sta
become apparent. things that help people age successfully are things that our moms probably taught us: eat right, exercise, stay involved and active. people who age well really do seem to be folks who have maintained a lot of physical and cognitive kinds of activity. the fact is, many seniors do not eat adequately, for reasons not necessarily related to their physical condition, or to their economic well-being. dr. lipson: most of our frail seniors in this country are women, because men don't live as long. as a consequence, it's often a situation where the woman of the family has cooked the meals, and now she has no one to cook for, so there's no reason to cook. and so you tend to get processed foods or fast foods, some of which have high salt, and some of which have high fat. and so it's important that one be careful, and not get into a situation where you're getting malnourished by eating. ...it's tough exercise, you know? exercise is another important ingredient in the recipe for a long life... but not just any kind of exercise. dr. lipson: walking has been the most importt type of
media programs call 1-800-learner and visit us at www.learner.org. ¿la podría usar, en una oración, por favor?c'. en el evento improbable de que su firma de corretaje cierre, sipc está ahí para protegerlo. sipc. c-i- lo siento, roberto. eso es incorrecto. lisa flores. lisa, tu palabra también es 'sipc'. ¿podría tenerla en otra oración, por favor? los fondos de sipc están disponibles para satisfacer las reclamaciones de los clientes de firmas de corretaje hasta un máximo de $500,000, incluyendo hasta $100,000 por rec 'sipc', eftivo s-i-p-k. ¿no conoce a sipc - securities investor protection corporation? no importa. se lo deletrearemos. visite nos www.sipc.org. >> waves. light waves washing against our eyes, creating a vision of the world around us. [ thunder rumbling ] sound waves crashing against our ears, sometimes jarring and other times beautiful. cosmic waves bathing the universe. all of it explained, illuminated, and connected via mathematics. sometimes we call it harmonic analysis, other times we call it spectral analysis, but most people call it fourier analysis. of all
these ancient families tell us about our own families ? around the world, archaeologists are looking far beyond the palaces and temples into the households of common people, bringing families to life out of the past. come forward all the way. oooh ! that's it. good. hold on me. come forward. ease the baby out with little pushes. come on. you can do it. beautiful ! the baby's coming up to you. waaahh ! keach: every newborn child immediately confronts three basic needs -- food, shelter and education. in the beginning, these needs are met at home. but in industrial societies, that soon changes. teacher: times three... we educate our children in schools. how would you read this number ? 21,000. you're getting these two a little mixed up from the example before. we earn our daily bread in offices, and we buy it in markets. but in many cultures, the household is still the most basic unit of society, where people spend most of their days, producing what they need to live and teaching their children their values and culture. anthropologist richard wilk. a household is an activity group. it's a group of
sense to us. maybe in tomorrow's world, when we goose up to speeds like that, it will be. i'll give you an example. when you go to the travel agents today you see these exotic posters on their walls, right? they get posters of the hawaiian islands, right? and everyone wants to spend a little time in the hawaiian islands, right? so they put these posters of the hawaiian islands with the palm trees and all that, the royal hawaiian hotel and all-- it makes you wanna get a couple of weeks off and go there, doesn't it? anyway, you see these posters of places. how many posters have you ever seen in a travel agent that posts times? like, you can talk about traveling to south america, you can talk about traveling to the mainland. you can talk about traveling to europe, but can you go to the travel agent today and talk about traveling into time? we got new years coming up. we got a big one pretty soon, 2000, the year 2000, okay? and then 2001, 21st century, yeah? how about someone says, well, i'm not so much interested in that. i'm kind of a futurist. most of my friends are sort of like historia
somewhere around st. louis was creamed with a major earthquake in the early 1800, yes it can happen in the u.s. >> you are right. what's the name of that fault? >> the new madrid fault, it runs through southern illinois and into missouri. and - there is the possibility >> of course there is a possibility. there is also a possibility that when the millennium comes we are all going to blow up. >> there are more possibilities that there is going to be an earthquake on the new madrid fault, due to geological fact, that's my point. >> this will show you how it can happen. i live in a slab house, concrete one floor. i was in the family room ironing and i was hanging up a shirt and the iron started going like this and i said whatever you kids are doing up there cut it out. i didn't realize - it's a first time i experienced a tremor, and it was right in park forest. so it did happen and it's happened since. >> well speaking of faults i'm at an incredible fault here for not getting to the roll-in on sects and cults. so, but you're right, you're exactly right about the power of media and the history of
small to actually see, even under a high powered microscope. but, we can use biochemical reactions to amplify the dna. successive mutations to the hereditary material of certain cells produce oncogenes-- "on" switches that accelerate cell growth. tumor suppressor genes, "off" switches that restrict growth, may also mute .. become lost from the hereditary makeup of a cell. when this happens, a cell can make billions of copies of its abnormal self. the excess tissue forms a mass-- a tumor. some tumors are benign... they don't invade nearby tissue or spread to other parts of the body. but a malignant tumor is cancer. its cells can invade and destroy healthy tissue, and spread to other parts of the body through the blood and lymph system. when we get that tumor and we look at the molecular changes in the tumor, we're kind of looking at the end stage. it's not the end stage of the disease for the patient but it's kind of the end product. what we really need to understand is, what is the first mutation that allows that cell to have slight growth advantage? in other words, the cell is uns
we call firn. it's an old swiss term that's still used today. so eventually the firn itself gets more compact, more recrystallized, and it becomes glacier ice. subject to extreme, instantaneous stress, ice shatters like glass. but if stress such as gravity is applied gradually over a long period of time, the ice bends. this process, called plastic deformation, explains how glaciers move. generally, ice must accumulate to a thickness of approximately 20 meters before movement starts. pulled by gravity, ice in a glacier typically shifts down slope a few millimeters per day. to study glacial flow, louis agassiz and his students built a hut on the ice itself. they observed that the center of the glacier moved most quickly, while friction slowed down movement along its sides. a similar phenomenon is observed in rivers and streams. scientists like agassiz also wanted to understand how glaciers flow internally. but it wasn't until early in the post-world war ii era that glaciologists were able to drill a hole through a swiss glacier. and this was a hole several hundred meters deep, maybe a c
of color. i'm sure it will attract a lot of attention. and probably get us thrown out of the neighborhood. maybe we just need to make the menu a little more exciting. i bought some chili peppers at a vegetable market last weekend. i'm going to put them in tomorrow's chicken special. well, thanks for the warning. i'll be sure to put extra ice water at all the tables. i bet the customers will love it. well, if nothing else, it'll clear out their sinuses. thank you, rosa. that sounds delicious. so what did you do this weekend, mr. brashov ? well, on saturday i cleaned up my office. and on sunday i caught up on some paperwork. talk about a wild weekend. - don't you ever have any fun ? - i run a business here. - who has time for fun ? - mr. brashov, maybe it's time you started to date. in romania men of my age do not date. in mexico they don't either. but this is america. you just have to get the word out. let the women know you are available. maybe jamal can make me a sign. what's the problem, victor ? you're pacing back and forth like an expectant fa
of members of public come in front of us, looking for reasons why all of these projects were overbudget and i think there is a lot of waste there government. we just talked about the hetch hetchy matter and building was supposed to be $140 million, but it was actually $65 million over budget. the department of public works doesn't even have all of its receipts. the bond oversight committee is supposed to be have access to those receipts. they can't get them. so we ce[6ud money is not accounted for. we found waste in the arts commission, which the controllers office confirmed and the civil grand jury confirm and we also found waste in various other departments. and this board of supervisors needs people on it who will actually ask those questions. thank you. we have a couple other candidates who wanted to jump in here. mr. davis and miss selby. >> after $1.5 billion in public service sector cuts in san francisco since 2008, since our budget crisis, we can't balance our budget going forward on cuts alone. we have got to look for revenue with muni failing and unmaintained parks we need a comp
people to be allowed to use the parking permits to park on meters in shopping areas so i would propose that i am definitely opposed to send meters and saturday meters. it's a deterrent to patronizing small business. >> okay. the resulting economy has resulted in internet base for short term rentals and many of the rentals are illegal and the hotel tax is not collected. should the city legalize some or all of the arrangements and collect a hotel tax and we will begin with you -- i will be glad to repeat the question. >> i honestly don't know how you would enforce a law like that. of course everyone should pay their fair share but i don't know how you could enforce that. i believe we should standardize the inlaw units, maybe sure they're up to code and regulate any new units but as far as taxation i cannot see how you could actually enforce that and collect the taxes on it. >> thank you sir. mr. yee. >> cheryl i just want to make sure -- >> i can repeat it. there is internet base market for short base rentals and they sublease units to visitors and tourists and many are illegal and th
conce allows weaving to be performed from either side using multiple groups of yarn twisted together and passed over varying numbers of warps through the months of april and may, meter by meter the forms of the tapestry gradually begito emerge. miro has said of his approach to art, "things come to me slowly. my vocabulary formsas not been the discovery of a day. it took shape alst in spite of myself. in this way, ty ripen in my spirit." into the steamy month of august, the spirit of "femme" grows until the figure is complete. now, with only a few inches of background remaining, royo welcomes miro to his studio once more to witness the final steps of an eight-month process. royo says, "working together, we have become solosely attuned that i can almost read his mind. i take direction as much from an expression or gesture as from words or sketches. working with miro has forced me make a constant effort to do better, an effort from which i have benefited in many respects." for these two catalan artists, it has been a fulfilling experience. what was born in the imagination of one artist
about this and other annenberg media programs call 1-800-learner and visit us at www.learner.org. ¿la podría usar, en una oración, por favor?c'. en el evento improbable de que su firma de corretaje cierre, sipc está ahí para protegerlo. sipc. c-i- lo siento, roberto. eso es incorrecto. lisa flores. lisa, tu palabra también es 'sipc'. ¿podría tenerla en otra oración, por favor? los fondos de sipc están disponibles para satisfacer las reclamaciones de los clientes de firmas de corretaje hasta un máximo de $500,000, incluyendo hasta $100,000 por rec 'sipc', eftivo s-i-p-k. ¿no conoce a sipc - securities investor protection corporation? no importa. se lo deletrearemos. visite nos www.sipc.org. funding for this program is provided by annenberg/cpb, to advance excellent teaching. poussaint: the term "interest group" tends to have a negative meaning, and some interest groups do present problems for a democracy. but there's a positive side as well. large and small, rich and poor, tightly or loosely organized, interest groups bring pressure on public officials to promote particular
for the f.p.a conning tower. and the newspapers used to carry light verse, every newspaper. there were about twenty-five of them at that time, not two or three now owned by two people in the world, you know. and they actually carried light verse. well, yip and ira and dorothy parker, the whole crowd, had light verse in there, and, you know, they loved it. so, when the crash came and yip's business went under, and he was about anywhere from $50,000 to $70,000 in debt, his partner went bankrupt. he didn't. he repaid the loans for the next 20 or 15 years, at least. ira and he agreed that he should start writing lyrics. amy goodman: let's talk about what yip is most known for: finian's rainbow, the wizard of oz. right here, what do we have in front of us? ernie harburg: we have a lead sheet. we are in the gallery of the lincoln center for the performing arts, and there's an exhibition called "the necessity of rainbows," which is the work of yip harburg. and we are looking at the lead sheet of "brother, can you spare a dime?" which came from a review called americana, whichit was the first review
so many times. i just didn't think it would happen right now. i don't want us to be apart anymore. there are still so many things i want to do. i'm learning so much in my business classes-- we don't have to get married right away. we could set a date for perhaps a year from now. you know, miguel, i want to open my own restaurant. maybe not now, but someday. - that's wonderful ! - yes, but i've always thought i'd do it in this country. do you think it would be possible for you to move here, too ? i would have to start my career all over again. but you can practice architecture anywhere, can't you ? rosita, puebla is our home. it's where our families are; our friends. don't you ever get homesick ? all the time. but i don't want to give up what i have here. what if you could open your own restaurant in puebla, and much sooner than you ever could here ? how could i do that ? with help from me. i know i would always have your support, but i-- rosa, i am talking about more than that. i am talking about being partners in this restaurant. rosa... i miss you. i want
things you never knew existed. it's a rare film for really allowing us to see the pressures and the constraints and the demands on masculinity on men for an ideal of masculinity. i think in lang's kind of worldview, what he sees is that that little guy is going to lose, you know, that the cynics of the world are going to be able to prey on people who are believers. "scarlet street" could be considered film noir for a number of reasons. first of all, you have a kind of illusion of bourgeois or petty bourgeois order which the bank clerk represents, and that is disrupted. he's cast out from his normal existence into a dangerous, glamorous street world. that sequence when chris cross first sees kitty is close to being the essence of noir. it stopped raining. yeah, a half-hour ago. oh, which way is it to the east side subway? 'round the corner, past the el, 4 blocks. oh, thank you, officer. i guess i got turned around. these streets are all mixed up in greenwich village. (hoberman) appearances are deceptive. space is deformed by the lighting patterns. it's the city late at night.
stated, "little by little, i have managed to reach a point at which i use no more than a small number of forms and colors." this process found a culminating expression the maquette for the tial gallery's tapestry. miro entered the project with much enthusim, stating, "i'll go into this and fight it through with everything i have." over my months, the tapestry took shape in his imagination. finally, in 1976 it waset down rapidly as a maquette. in the ancient catalan city of tarragona, joan miro meets with young master weaver josep royo to discuss the transformation of his painting into a 10-meter-high tapestry. studying a photograph of the maquette, they consider how best to translate miro's art into a heavily- textured weaving, which would capture the spirit of his concept. royo has an enormous task before him. in this converted flour mill in tarragona, many months of preparation are needed before the weaving itself can begin. nearly four miles of heavy cotton line is measured, stretched and chained for use as the tapestry's vertical warp. royo has developed a unique loom for weaving
continues to shrink. i think now what used to be a one-pound can of tomatoes is about 13 and a quarter ounces. now, you just run into that all the time- the idea that more and more stores like walgreens and some of these big ones, they only want to stock the items that have a very short shelf life. so if you happen to be in the habit of using something that's maybe not the fastest-mover of a maybe a medium mover, or heaven forbid, a slow mover, you know, you can't get it anymore. and i think when you live with this kind of- a mind set that no one's really thinking of you- we're not customers anymore who are always right; we're consumers, whose mission, in the eyes of the television commercial, is to buy, buy, buy, consume, consume, consume. yeah, we're not vacuum cleaners for what they produce. >> but what's your point? i mean, that's capitalism. i mean, we're not talking about an ethical issue here unless you're talking about- the difference between a spiritual approach to commerce versus a greedy approach to commerce, for want of another word. >> okay. greedy's bad, in my view. >> ah
to decay? it turns out a long time. it turns out 4 1/2 billion years. yeah. and you know, when i used to prospect for uranium, i used to find uranium, you know? and that for every time i'd find uranium inside that rock, guess what also was there? - the lead. - lead. and guess how much lead compared to how much uranium? more. about same-same, which means that what, the age of that rock is about what? 4 1/2 billion year, that's the age of the earth. so 4 1/2 billion years is the radioactive half-life for the isotope uranium 238. that means in 4 1/2 billion years, all the 238 atoms around, half of them on the average will have decayed to something else. now, that's a long half-life. a shorter half-life is like a radium. radium, i think, is 1,620 years, something like that. and radioactive carbon 14, that's 5,730 years. and little neutrons, it turns out a neutron by itself is radioactively decayed. and that will decay in about 12 minutes, half-life about 12 minutes. and then a little new-- at a 2 millionths of a second, half of them will decay, so there's a whole range of radioactive path
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